Why It’s Important to Fail and Celebrate

Luke here again. So: my GID process was a bit bumpy— expected for a first timer. I was energized enough afterwards to try two other library projects before the end of the year and found myself molding the requirements of existing projects around GID principles. Collaboration is never perfect, but GID is a great way to practice it. A successful GID project requires an inquiry community led by a learning team who model best inquiry and collaboration practices. GID is also about taking risks and growing a culture within a school. Creating a sustainable GID is important, so I worked with my two trusted allies at the school:

  • An energetic 5th grade teacher, Ms. Breite, who was working on a Historical Fiction Creative Writing assignment. I focused on developing a Share, Create, and Evaluate phase for the end of her project. She had a good idea of what to do for the beginning of the assignment and my English background helped to kick it off, and at the end of the writing process, we added in a round-robin reading of the stories at a Share Fair where students read drafts and gave feedback, sharing out their favorite parts. I also pushed Ms. Breite to include a self-assessment as part of the final rubric.
  • I also pushed the music teacher, Mr. Kelly, who was interested in having the students do Photo Essays, to value process over product in the assignment. I reframed the idea of a ‘Photo Essay’ as but one way of synthesizing an understanding about a musical topic. Here, I implemented an Immerse phase where students found a musician they were interested in, an Identify where they came up with inquiry questions, and revamped the Gather phase to include library databases.

Highlighting the beginning and end of the GID process to bring it to teachers worked well. The question of collaboration is one of magnitude, and GID takes a lot of time commitment. But one way to ease in is to ask: How much is the teacher willing to change? As the English teacher, I trial-ran GID on my own— it gave me a feel for the flow. As the librarian, which comes with its own form of salesmanship, the best tools for implementing GID were as follows:

    • Do the work. Show your collaborators you have done some work, and share that work with them on Google Drive. I used the things I knew how to use: the self-reflection rubrics I designed for my Poetry Project were modified for Ms. Breite’s class, and they themselves were adapted from the 5 Kinds of Learning rubric. I used a version of Anita’s collaboration document for planning both.
    • Slow down and let go. Allowing enough scheduled time for inquiry and interest activation during open was an eye-opener, I stressed choice across the whole project too, with how the student was reacting to the problems they were encountering to the final product they choose for Create. I needed to spend more time on Gather with my English students. We needed more time refining our questions.
    • Acknowledge that you are just like the students. Teachers aren’t the only ones breaking habits during their first GID experience. Telling students what to do is vastly different than guiding them. There was palpable unease with my 7th graders. Many were hesitant to come up with their own research questions and project proposals in lieu of asking: “What are we supposed to do?” “We are Immersing today, here are the best practices for it…” Students need to practice it just like we do and working on it over the course of the year is important, like good ol’ Responsive Classroom with community behavior. As a teacher, you want social and emotional behaviors within an Inquiry Community to be reinforced through GID. GID holds up a brilliant mirror: the phases require teachers to reflect alongside students. The learning team is modeling exactly what students are doing so planning and collaborating on GID is an inquiry exercise for all.

 

  • To start, steal. Showing a teacher with whom you are collaborating how what they are doing can be cultivated in the name of Inquiry and Social-Emotional learning is fun. At first, it may not be pretty, though. Go hunting for ideas. Piecemealing from resources like Guided Inquiry Design in Action: High School— tip of the hat to Kathy Boguszewski and her GID project on the National History Day “Taking a Stand Theme” (p. 157-214)— and from mentors, like Anita, is a great start. Remember stealing is different than copying.

 

  • Celebrate the journey. I made the collaborating teacher’s willingness to join me on the journey of GID the most important thing in my life that week. The difficult part, I observed, is the teachers relinquishing a bit of control over things like topics and final products. Getting two of the phases into the project is enough to celebrate— let them know what they did and what they can try next time. I mean, don’t over do it, but highlight the benefits of the inquiry and the social-emotional aspects of the projects. Make a survey for the students to reflect on how well the learning team did.

Of course, Leslie Maniotes has provided me a roadmap for what to do next: continue to build the foundation. Each little lesson can be a brick in that structure. Reflect and modify the brick if needed. She urges us to create support structures and systems that develop and sustain inquiry and commit to keeping it around. So I’m going to try and do just that. Thank you for reading, now I’m going elsewhere on the blog for other ideas! Happy guiding!

Luke Steere

Hillside School, Massachusetts

Mirror, Mirror: Reflecting on Reflection

As I started the process of reflecting on my experience with GID for this final blog posting, I was also reminded of how valuable the same process is for our students.  Taking the time to reflect on our experiences is when the opportunity for growth occurs. There is a reason so many districts moved to the Danielson evaluation framework, because it is meant to be reflective.  And while not always used in that way, the goal of the Domains is to get teachers thinking about their work and its impact on students. For our students, the practice of reflecting through peer conferencing, journaling, or teacher conferencing and to be provided the time to actually identify or implement change can help students see the value in the process.  

Reflection also allows us to address the fact that research can be an emotional roller coaster for our students, as explained in Kuhlthau’s Model of the Information Search Process (Kuhlthau, Maniotes and Caspari, 17).  It is with that in mind that we have a responsibility as practitioners of the Guided Inquiry Design model to recognize where our students are emotionally in the process and provide the necessary opportunities to reflect and grow as they navigate through the research steps.

While many research models include a step at the end which focuses on evaluation, the GID model has the evaluation and reflection process built in throughout, in the form of inquiry journaling.  The inquiry journals can be used for the researching components as well as for reflective responses. This journaling opportunity gives teachers to chance to see where students may be stuck or struggling with the process, as well as allow students to step back from the research and look at the process as a whole.  To do this, my lesson planning often includes a reflective closure activity or journaling opportunity. At first, students are often resistant to the idea of having to reflect, but as they become more practiced and confident in their understanding of the process, they are more likely to share honest experiences. And, we owe it to our students to not only help them become critical thinkers about the world around them, but also about themselves.

The introduction of Guided Inquiry Design as a research model has had a direct impact on my daily instruction.  I look at each research project a bit more critically and in co-planning have found myself taking time at the start of the planning process to give my co-teacher a quick overview of the steps and what the goal is for each one.  But sometimes, without really reading the literature about the process, I find that the nuances which exist in each step are missing from the understanding of a general educator. You can develop all the projects you want using the process steps, but if students never interact with each other, discuss their excitement, explore a variety of options in various formats or receive guidance from their teachers, it is then that students miss out.  I have worked with teachers who create lots of graphic organizers or worksheets aligned to the GID steps and curriculum, but don’t take the time to plan out what the group work looks like, or what the reflections will be, or the teaching strategies for questioning. And, that is where we as librarians or GID teacher practitioners can step in. The steps are not a set of boxes to check off, but rather an instructional support system which gathers best practices and integrates them into the inquiry process.

Best of luck as you continue to integrate the GID process into your work and in your planning! Your students will thank you…one day 🙂

Cheers,

Sarah Scholl

Havre de Grace Middle School

Havre de Grace, Maryland

 

@hdmslibrary

@thebossysister

 

Kuhlthau, Carol C., et al. Guided Inquiry: Learning in the 21st Century. Libraries Unlimited, 2015.

 

How do you incorporate reflection into your GID planning?

Teach Out Loud

This past week, as I was searching for new innovative ideas to bring to my classroom, I came across the sayings, “Shut the door and teach!” and “Open the door and teach!”  While I get the point of the first, I wholeheartedly advocate for the second. Teaching should not be an isolated event. We need to come together to improve learning for students. In addition, if you are doing amazing things things in your classroom, share it.

Yesterday, I had the amazing opportunity to share GID with passionate educators at an Edcamp event I helped facilitate. If you’ve never heard of Edcamp, it’s an event that is driven by participant interest. Participants post questions and topics of interest at the beginning the event, and then sessions are determined based on those topics. One of the topics happened to be inquiry based learning, so I was thrilled to have another opportunity to share ideas. Not only was I able to share my GID unit on Earth’s Systems, but I was able to pick up ideas as well. One idea was using the website Thrively to administer a survey to gather students interest. One teacher shared how she learned that a lot of her students were interested in biology, so she replaced a prior unit she had planned with one based on their interest. What a powerful way to give students a voice and choice in the classroom. If I had never searched out other educators to collaborate with, I would likely have not heard about this powerful tool. I encourage you to build your personal learning network and grow. Twitter is a great way to connect with passionate educators from around the world. When we teach out loud and link arms with passionate educators, we have the potential to transform learning for our students.

Writing this blog and sharing a little bit about what happens in my classroom has been a pleasure. It has allowed me to reflect on my practice, as well as given me the drive and commitment to finish the year strong. Thank you Leslie Maniotes, for providing educators this space to share their experiences with implementing GID in their classrooms.

Rebecca Wilkin

Selma Unified

@beccalmorris83

The pride in my heart

Students discussing their research and filling out evaluations for each “presentation”

I am immensely proud of my students’ work during this Guided Inquiry Unit. For my final post, I wanted to share a few things that warmed my teacher heart.

My goals for this Unit have always been to increase student engagement and scientific discussion in my classroom. This Guided Inquiry unit hit the nail on the head.

As students began their research, they were constantly running up to my desk or stopping me as I meandered about the classroom with a “OMG Mrs. J did you know…?”. One student brought to my attention (long before I found it on my own) the article of an astronaut whose DNA is now different from his identical twin because of space travel.

One of my student’s project – their question was “How could genetic engineering be used to help bring endangered species back from the brink of extinction?”

Since we knew that the research my students would be attempting would be very high level, we made sure students were looking at other resources for information, such as: videos, literature, podcasts, and artwork. One of my students cited A Brave New World by Aldous Huxley in her research as an insight to what could go wrong if we slip into   genetic modifications. I was blown away by this!

Originally “powerpoint” was not on my list of approved projects, however, this student did a TED Talk style presentation and I just could not say no to that!!

Our Share phase was probably the day I was most proud of. To present our research, I decided to approach it as a gallery walk. What I enjoyed the most were the exchanges I saw between students when they visited with each other. Students had debates about the ethics of GMOs, giving each other praise and being genuinely curious about what others learned. I heard such great conversations as I walked around, but I didn’t stop since I knew they wouldn’t talk if I stood there. Hearing them speak with knowledge and confidence put a huge smile on my face and sent me skipping down the hallway.

I loved watching my students grow during this process and become excited about research. They all recognized that it is difficult but extremely gratifying when they find what they needed.

As I write this, I am sitting in the Oklahoma House of Representatives hoping and praying our schools get funded so I can get back to the students I miss and the job I love.

Thank you for letting me share my GID experience with you!!

Fight On Tigers!

Rachelle Johnson

Norman High School – Science Teacher

Time and Patience

“Would your learners come back to your class tomorrow if they didn’t have to?” –Trevor Mackenzie

I have a tall order for a Monday morning: we’re being very honest with ourselves today!

If you’re a more experienced teacher, you might realize upon self-reflection that it’s very tempting to fall into a rut. Because, let’s face it, teaching is exhausting. Tailoring instruction to your specific students, allowing for exceptionalities of all types, being creative, giving constructive feedback, entering grades, calling parents… I’ll just stop the list right there.

However, it does us good as educators to be reminded that our attitudes, tone, and demeanor dictate the paths of learning in our classrooms. I think it’s fair to say that in an average American public school, there are a lot of demands being made on teachers which can obscure our vision. How can we break through that fog to rediscover the joy and fun of educating others?

Let Guided Inquiry Design lead the way! This inquiry model isn’t effective solely for the students, but also for the educators. When was the last time you put yourself in your learners’ shoes? Done something you’d never tried before? Read something about which you knew absolutely nothing? Read something that you knew would be very difficult? Put yourself outside of your comfort zone? Engaging in these things makes us feel like learners and discoverers again, which means remembering what it’s like to feel uncomfortable and anxious and overwhelmed. We know this is exactly what happens to learners thanks to the Information Search Process research conducted by Kuhlthau and reaffirmed over the past 2 decades!

This week, I’m going to share some ideas that I plan to present next week at the South Carolina Association of School Librarian (SCASL) conference in Greenville, SC.  I will be encouraging fellow librarians to take steps to foster an inquiry mindset with their students based on the GID model, sharing some successes and struggles I have had. In this blog post today, I’m going to focus on two issues which I personally believe greatly influence our level of success: time and patience.

How many times today have you already said, “I don’t have time for that!”? Keep track and analyze your results. Time hasn’t changed; we still have 24 hours each day! Librarians hear that response a lot when we suggest alternatives to students taking notes from PowerPoint presentations or reading from a textbook. Although we do live in the age of standardized testing, there are still a lot of courses at the high school level which are not tested. Be honest with yourself about how you spend your time with your students. You don’t need to worry about drill-and-kill with content area knowledge if students are encountering your content in authentic texts and authentic learning activities (like visiting a museum, listening to a guest speaker, interviewing their local government representative). Remember yourself as a student. If you didn’t like to read your textbook when you were a student, then there is no chance your own students do.

Have you ever passed out a research assignment to students as the beginning of a unit? Do you only allow students a day or two to find information? Librarians know from experience that research is often presented in this way. If you find yourself dreading a research assignment as much as your students, then you know it’s time for a change. Students who feel pressured to complete work quickly will not turn in quality work, nor will they probably care because an intent to learn has not been established. Yes, exploration and discovery take time. But what a useful way to use the time we have! Partner with fellow teachers and librarians in your building to help brainstorm and share resources. There is never a reason to go it alone.

Be willing to honestly examine your own attitude toward time. You teach your students about what is important through your words, actions, body language, and tone. Make exploration and discovery something you can’t wait to do either, and be the learning role model for your students. As Kuhlthau (2015) states in Guided Inquiry: Learning in the 21st Century, “Guided Inquiry has the power to excite students about using resources for learning” (114). Furthermore, “Sources from the community enliven the inquiry process” (115). Use your time to find resources beyond your textbook or PowerPoint presentation: the school library, fiction, objects, museums, experts, parents, public library, business professionals, community officials.

Guided Inquiry Design states that during inquiry, the learning team “uses modeling, listening, and encouraging” to engage and guide students. Prioritize time in your classroom and library to model curiosity, listen to students throughout their process of discovering information, and encourage questioning.

These ideas naturally lead into the second issue I believe is greatly important: patience. I am the first to admit that I struggle with this one! Patience and time are directly linked. If students are going to build their own knowledge through an inquiry stance and develop information literacy skills, then they have to be the ones doing the learning. We don’t need more research and books to prove that to be true again and again. How many times did it take you to truly learn something well enough that you could teach it to someone else? Probably more than once! Allowing students to make mistakes, maybe even on purpose, so they can learn from them is critical. Avoid telling students answers. Use questioning to guide their thinking.

Moreover, being patient with someone shows that you care. Being patient shows that you are willing to give your time to someone else. When students trust their educators, a safe learning environment is established and they are willing to take more risks which can lead to more discoveries. Be patient with learners as they reflect on their abilities in order to make goals, then give them the time to reach those goals.

Dedicating time and patience to the inquiry process has many rewards! Return to the question which begins this post. Do you even want to return to your classroom? Being excited and curious, having patience, and using authentic sources of information will influence how students answer.

In my next post, I will share some ideas for the Open, Immerse, and Explore phases of GID and why they are so important to the inquiry mindset.

–Jamie Gregory, NBCT Library Media, Duncan, SC

@gregorjm   jamie.gregory@spart5.net

Past GID blog posts: https://52guidedinquiry.edublogs.org/2017/06/19/it-all-starts-with-a-question/; https://52guidedinquiry.edublogs.org/2017/06/21/concepts-and-questioning/; https://52guidedinquiry.edublogs.org/2017/06/23/keyword-inquiry-log/; https://52guidedinquiry.edublogs.org/2017/06/25/individualized-reading-plans-and-reflection/

 

 

Lead, Reflect, Inspire: 52-GID in 2018

I’m Leslie Maniotes- co-creator and author of the Guided Inquiry Design process and book series, leader of this blog. I’m taking the blog, for one post, to welcome this new year, set the vision for this work and inspire engagement.

Get a cup of tea or your favorite beverage, I’m here to tell you a story.  I made this post a pretty hyperconnected document so you can dig in more deeply to the details of my story, if you are so moved. Enjoy!

As many of you know I live in Colorado.  My husband and I moved out here from North Carolina, when I was accepted to the Doctoral program at CU Boulder in 2000.  Having lived in North Carolina for 15 years prior, we loved exploring the Boulder area and showing our new digs to friends visiting from the east coast.  One time, back in 2004, we were in Boulder, on the famous Pearl Street mall, with some friends from our Guilford College days, and as we crossed Broadway, a man on a bicycle was zooming by.  Being the observant guy he is, my husband recognized that this was not just another fit conscious Boulderite or Boulder professor scooting off to class, but it was the famous David Byrne from the Talking Heads. (wikipedia is good for some things)

Having graduated high school in the Stop Making Sense era – he was an icon we all recognized. We all shouted “Hey David!” To which he turned, smiled, and gave us a big wave as he bumped down the curb. This was back in 2004 and David was beginning his quest starting with riding bikes in the cities he was visiting. Turns out, he loved the experience as it gave him a new perspective on the cities and so he got involved in the bike sharing movement.

Well, 14 years later, David is telling a larger story with his new record album  which he says is about looking and asking . (Fitting for Guided Inquiry, right?) And, he is finding new channels to tell this story about Reasons to Be Cheerful.

In his talk at the New School this week, he shared some really inspiring “cheer worthy” stories, that he has been a part of across the globe.  In this speech, he also named a few key qualities to all that he found. These good ideas;

  1. Typically arose from the bottom up
  2. They were not specific to any one culture
  3. They were proven to be successful by the people themselves.
  4. They were not singular isolated incidents of goodness, but could be replicated

It’s pretty inspiring to hear about ordinary people becoming more engaged in their communities through libraries, community events, and organizing. There’s great possibility in when a group of people believe in something- they declare “THIS IS IT!!” and spread that feeling by taking action and replicating the results in their own contexts.

A little sidebar- in his talk at the New School he showed this graphic (at about minute 34) of a UPenn study in New York neighborhoods. It showed how cultural resources, libraries and community arts centers, postively impacted the people who live in those communities. Byrne mentioned this and then said all things are connected. Things that you think might not be connected, actually are. He specifically named that child abuse, obesity, crime went down, while student test scores in schools rose 18% in these vibrant communities with rich cultural resources.

So, you may be wondering why I’m mentioning this here.  Well, this blog is our community of practice!  You have decided that Guided Inquiry is IT! It has helped you reach students in new ways, teach the way “you’ve always wanted to teach”, engage students, lead others, and be a better professional!  This blog is how we share that practice. This blog serves as a space that is changing the narrative of what is happening in education.  Through your stories, as we raise our voices together, we are sharing many things to be cheerful about in education.

Many people don’t know about Guided Inquiry, but through your stories, people are learning that schools can include more voice and choice. Students can create inspiring and creative works to share their knowledge and understandings with others, and that through inquiry, our students learn to be connected to their world in ways before unimaginable.

With that, won’t you please join me for another year of cheer, of leadership, and of reflection where educators across the globe are inspired by the possibility of Guided Inquiry Design, where others might come and replicate your ideas, to make their community and schools more vibrant with questions and student voice in learning, like yours.

Here’s to another great year! We can’t wait for you to tell your story. Thanks for being a part of it.

On January 21st, we welcome Teresa Diaz who will kick off the new year.  She is new to the blog, a middle school librarian from San Antonio, Texas. She will share her learning about using the QFT within the framework of GID.  Stay tuned folks! And sign up , if you haven’t already! 

Peace and Joy to you all!

Leslie Maniotes, PhD

Author/Education Consultant for Guided Inquiry Design

Creator of Guided Inquiry Design (with Dr. Carol Kuhlthau and Ann Caspari)

Top Posts in 2017! Thanks to all bloggers and readers!

Hi GID’ers!

As we close out another year of our blog we want to celebrate all the innovative educators who committed to sharing their reflective practice with us and our community! We are making a difference, telling positive stories about our work in schools and helping others to find new ways to innovate and think differently about teaching and learning in their schools.  This year our 52GID blog had almost 4,000 new visitors with over 13,000 page views!

THANK YOU!

In this second year, we had over 30 participants with 100 posts from all over the US, Canada, Australia, Finland, Pakistan, and Croatia! There have been all kinds of cross curricular examples in all areas math, english language arts, arts, psychology, history, science, leadership and more. You’ve had a great year of growth and as each person shares, we all grow in our understanding of the process, its multitude of variations, and how it looks with different learners.  If you’ve missed some posts, relax over your holiday break and take some time to search some topics interesting to you. There’s  a lot to read about here!

SHOUT OUTS

Congratulations to our top bloggers of the year:

Coming in at #3 Marc Crompton Teacher Librarian, St George School, Vancouver, BC

Marc came in third and had more than 100 views on his entry called “The Questions that Drive Me Forward” where he reflected on a topic near and dear to him- connections between Design Thinking and GID.  These two processes are mutually informing and Marc continues this conversation on his own blog later in the year.  Read more from him on his own blog Adventures in Libraryland – here

#2 is Trisha Hutchinson – Teacher Librarian, Monroe Elementary School, Norman, OK

Almost 200 readers enjoyed Trisha’s reflection on moving from Librarian to leader through collaborating with teachers working with Guided Inquiry Design.  Trisha is a librarian in the district in Norman, Oklahoma where over 400 teachers and all librarians have all participated in the GID Institute and the process is becoming the way students learn across the district.  In her post “From Teacher Librarian to Leader” she explores how GID grew across her elementary school building through her leadership and knowledge sharing on the process and through various attempts at different grade levels.

Our #1 blogger for 2017 is Jamie Rentzel – Norman High School Math Teacher, Norman OK

With over 450 views, Jamie Rentzel topped the readership this year with her post on using GID in math.  Her post Guided Inquiry in a High School Math Classroom, Really? was a huge hit with readers.  In this post she connected the need to link students of mathematics to real world applications and GID is just the platform to do that important work. She goes on to explain how she did just that in her unit on  Sequences and Series.

Thanks to all of you for your thoughtful reflections throughout this year of growth, helping our readers expand into new thinking about GID as a means to dig deeper into design thinking, leadership and new ways of approaching content learning for big gains with our students.  Win win win!

We hope you’ll join us for this year’s challenge!  Who know’s where 2018 will take us!

Cheers to all readers and bloggers alike!

Leslie Maniotes, PhD

Author and Consultant for Guided Inquiry Design

 

Research findings in the Finnish core curriculum, issues related to GID

Well, we have ended up to my last blog writing for now. In the previous blog post I gave a sneak peak to my doctoral research results. There are interesting findings in many perspective. Finlands core curriculum is rather versatile in information literacy issues. The problem will not be in curriculum, when we are working on teaching our students to be information savvy. The challenge we face is in teachers’ skills and use of tools; how to enhance the learning of students information literacy skills. This has been a challenge for a long time. And what are the tools?

The studied core curriculum presents issues, which function as preliminary phases before entering the information searching part. There is for example the inquiring mind. This idea is very similar with Guided Inquiry Design. The text in general changed from the 2004 core curriculum to 2014. The earlier often stated, that ‘the student will learn’ and ‘the student is taught’. The new 2014 core curriculum states ‘the student is encouraged’ and ‘the student is supported’, and so forth. This is pointing to a more student centred learning approach. The encouragement and supporting the students to find their own strengths and best learning styles is also about learning to learn.

The least interesting issue in 2014 core curriculum results at the moment is the part of information searching and critical thinking. These themes came out strong in the interviews. But what was emphasised in the core curriculum but not in the interviews was working with the found information. In my opinion the tools in GID could be extremely useful also in the context of the Finnish core curriculum.

The teachers in my study say, that the students have difficulty expressing their doings and thoughts in writing; especially when they would need to reflect on their learning. The tools in GID provides help in the construction of learning and making the progress more concrete and easier to follow for the student. Issues like reviewing, summarising, combining and constructing information is expected in the core curriculum. Students very often forget working with the information, since they are used to making homework like small tasks: finding facts and listing them on a worksheet, presentation or paper. As we know, this is also an issue of how to give and formulate the given assignment. It is also challenging for the students to learn a new way of working.

Learning to use the inquiry logs and journal is crucial in making the leanring concrete and in keeping the collected sources organised. These are magnificent tools for teachers to use. The recording of students learning and the tools to support the learning process are the core. When I tested GID in a small-scale project, the teachings during that process were remembered afterwards.

The assessment – the new ideology of continuous assessment by the teachers could be greatly benefitted by these tools as well. With the tools the teacher will know how the assignment result was reached during the process – not to mention to get the understanding of moments of possible interventions if needed during the process.

This was just a quick glimpse to the issues of how to combine GID and the Finnish core curriculum. The issue is as important as it is interesting. During 2017 I have also been involved in the research of false media, or fake news, whichever expression we want to use. Me and two other researchers have studied the use of sources of the most popular Finnish false media. We have with the same crew also written a book called Valheen jäljillä (On the track of lies) and it will be published in the beginning of 2018 (only in Finnish).

Seems like there are powers in the world at the moment, which try to divide people in case after case. Whether it is politics, sports, nutrition, or society. Even social media kind of got out of hands, as former Facebook manager Palihapitiya stated just now in December 2017. Our students have to reach a high enough level of general knowledge, reading skills, critical thinking skills and research skills to be able to come to a decision in whichever issue they face. In my mind, a lot of these issues could be set to a better track by implementing GID ideology.

I will be coming to Denver in the beginning of February 2018 for ALISE conference. In case one of you readers will be there too, please contact me! It would be very nice to exchange ideas! In case you are around, let me know: anu (at) anuojaranta (dot) com

Wishing all of you warm seasons greetings and a very happy new year!

 

GID greetings,

Anu

 

Finland – 100 years of independence!

I am very pleased Leslie saved a spot for me in order to blog about my thoughts. I wrote last year as well. It has been a pleasure to read all your practices in GID, this has given me a lot of inspiration! Finland has just celebrated the 100th birthday and it is an appropriate time to take a look at what is going on in education, a short glance.

Let me start by presenting myself. I am a librarian gone researcher. I have a history in school libraries. There were issues, which pushed me into information science research. I have planned my blogging week to be divided into three blog posts: one to present the current situation in Finland in the field of education and reading. The second to be about my research I am finalising at the moment and the last post to be about where in all this can we see Guided Inquiry Design having a place.

Finland is in the middle of a curriculum change, as the primary school changed into the new core curriculum in 2016 and the seventh grade in 2017. The eight and ninth grades will follow in 2018 and 2019. Curriculum change takes place approximately every 10 years. Therefore we are just in the beginning of this period.

As changes always, this gave reason to a lot of questions and even problems. The biggest change affecting all the work is the change in evaluation and assessment. Less numbers are given and most of the assessment should be done along the course, as continuous evaluation. The evaluation will be given in written and the teacher should have an evaluation discussion with each student. The students are also required to set their own goals for learning.

Another change has come in the form of phenomenon based learning. Every student is entitled into at least one phenomenon project during the school year. This means, that a theme, a phenomenon, is studied in collaboration with several subjects as a theme day, theme week or a longer project worked on once every week. There are several ways to carry this out. However, the problem has been finding the planning time, to fit the projects in to the hourly planning of different subjects. This is much easier to carry out in the primary school (1-6 classes, but to take this to the secondary school context (7-9 classes) with tighter subject boundaries – it does require more coordinating and planning.

Then there is an issue of the digital leap. For several years there has been a target to get more educational technology into schools and into learning. The digital leap has been a very hot subject in Finland. It feels like there are two camps: the ones that feel that IT (information technology) is not the key to better learning results and the camp where people feel it is the requirement for good learning results.

The issue is more complex than this. A private consulting company had rearranged the latest PISA results. They point out that the digital technology devises, which the student are using on their own in class are even worsening the learning results. The teachers’ use of technology had a more positive effect and also with the IT technology the students are using during past time. These results just indicate that the mere use of technology does not count as pedagogical use of technology. Which already made sense before the study.

Kuhankuono National Park

But the feeling I have at the moment is that the changes have come too fast and the schools were partly left with too little support and further education in this situation. There is a lot of frustration, working over hours and even resistance.

Then the issue of reading surfaced this October. The further analysis of 2016 PISA results show, that 10% of students graduating from compulsory comprehensive school (classes 1-9) have such poor reading skills that they difficulty to function in the society and in their further studies. The majority of these 10% are boys. The difference in reading skills between boys and girls is one of the biggest in comparison between all PISA countries. The government took initiative and established the Literacy Forum. This forum (which has 30 members, only 2 from libraries) has a goal by the end of August 2018 to come up with a plan, which would engage the whole nation to a community effort in reading, a reading bee.

In my doctoral research I have analysed the Finnish core curriculum looking for issues relating to information literacy skills. I have structured a model of these issues and will present it in my thesis. However, I have lately started to think that how is it that there are a lot of issues in library and information science, which would be of significant help in education, but these models just are not known in schools? Is it that the researchers cannot communicate to the field or in this case, is it about the difficulties to communicate from a field to another?

We take for example GID. We who know about the method have to be vigilant and energetic in pursuing contact with teachers and librarians. We should work with shareholders to see the benefits of library and information science resources to education. For some 20 years have teachers presented similar difficulties in students information behaviour. Still we are facing the same difficulties. Communication and collaboration is the key!

With best regards, Anu Ojaranta

(M.Ph., PhD student, qualified teacher)
Information Studies
Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland

Guided Inquiry and Our I Tech Initiative

by Cindy Castell

 

Norman Public Schools is experiencing a year of great change.  From the previous sentence, I would like to emphasize the word GREAT.  Change is happening in all kinds of ways.  Our buildings have all been updated and are fabulous learning spaces, and we have implemented our 1:1 technology initiative in grades 6-12 in addition to having 4-5 devices in every elementary classroom. This is thanks to our citizens overwhelmingly passing bond issues and to the vision of our district leaders.  

So I mentioned in my Day 1 post that I have a new job this year.  I am one of the six new I Tech Coaches.  Each of us is assigned to one secondary school where we are housed and 3 elementary buildings.  Overall, our main purpose is to help teachers integrate technology in a way that transforms learning from the traditional. From the NPS ITech website, “In the past, students attended school because that is where information was found.  Today, technology has made information accessible anytime, anywhere and offers vast educational resources for learners.” So even though NPS has not been a “sit and get” district for many years, people like Kathryn Lewis, Director of Media Services and Instructional Technology, have researched and sought out programs that will help our students.  By using the research-based ISTE Standards, Kathryn and other leaders in our district wanted to support students and teachers with sound practices.  The SAMR Model was also instrumental in setting the goals NPS had for technology.  They did not want the new computers to be just a substitution of what we were already doing, but instead a “transformation” where students are asking their own questions, collaborating with others, and sharing their learning with a broader audience. SAMR model explained: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=us0w823KY0g

So this year and in the years to come,  we have the opportunity to help teachers design and implement lessons that integrate technology in a way that transforms learning.  Guided Inquiry is one of the best models to do that with. We are thrilled that as Instructional Technology Coaches,  we get to work with our librarians to be part of the extended team.  We are off to an exciting start.  Even though Guided Inquiry has been going on in our buildings since 2015, we now have information, experts, and ways to communicate our learning right at our fingertips.  I am again grateful for how Guided Inquiry will play a major role in how our students across the district will use the technology.  We hope that districts around the country have the opportunity to share Guided Inquiry with their students.  We know that it will benefit all of our learners as they move through their education and their lives.