We all want to be Highly Effective!

hello everybody!

While I take some time to set up the schedule of the blog for 2017, I thought I would post some of what I have been thinking about and working on as of late.

All across the U.S. we have had a major movement in teacher effectiveness.  I became a part that movement when I joined the group of educators in Denver Public Schools called the Teacher Effectiveness Coaches.  Through my years with that group- we studied effectiveness in teaching.  We learned and collaborated together on how to foster increasing effectiveness through coaching at the school level.  It was very challenging work, and I learned so much through those years.  Since my awareness has been heightened to what it takes, emotionally, organizationally, on stage and off stage to be an effective teacher,  much of what I learned through those years has been applied and embedded into Guided Inquiry Design. I was working on the creation of GID while in those positions. Whether it is in the session planning, or in the workshops I do, when I train teams on how to design and implement inquiry based learning, effective teaching practices is core to what we do.

So, when the Colorado Department of Education (CDE) put out a Highly Effective School Library Program rubric, (which you can view here) I was really excited.  I believe in standards.  I think it’s important that people  know what to look for, and what is expected of them and that those expectations are clear.  When people have clear expectations, they can reach to higher heights as long as the bar is set high. From an administrative perspective, rubrics and standards of the field help us to hold people accountable to a high standard.  But what’s most important is that we are each pushing for that in our own work. And that’s why you’re here reading this right now, because you want to learn and grow as a professional- GO YOU!!

Through  my professional development workshops around the country and abroad and in conversations with excellent educators about GID, I have come to recognize that GID is a complex approach to teaching that requires a high level of our craft.

When I got my hands on the CDE rubric, I couldn’t wait to make connections to GID. I wanted to see if it would align and how GID might be used as a means to support CO educators to reach the highest level of their craft for the benefit of our students!

In the next couple of posts I am going to share my explanation of GID as a means to a highly effective library program.  I’m hoping this will begin a larger conversation around effective library programs and GID’s role in that for future ready libraries and schools!

So #1 on the Rubric is  Planning

By planning the authors meant having professional goals- (This document intentionally reflects the same wording as the teacher effectiveness framework in CO.  The library rubric was meant to support administrators to evaluate librarians in their role as teachers, valuing the difference in the work that they do, as well as making clear connections to how librarians are/can be most effective teachers.)

STANDARD 1

Program Standard 1: Planning

Planning for the future is an essential role for a successful teacher librarian and library program. Annual review of school focus goals, library data and collaborative input from the school community is part of developing a plan of action for continuous quality improvement

Component A: Planning

The teacher librarian, along with the principal, creates and uses school-aligned goals as a guide for developing a library program and instruction that positively impacts student achievement and helps students thrive in today’s society.
The teacher librarian uses data and reflection to measure implementation of goals.

Planning

Though you might not think that GID is related to teacher goal setting, it very well can (and maybe should) be. In one amazing school, the principal (knowing the research of the ISP) saw the connection between what it might take for teachers to identify goals  to work on for the year and the GID process. She saw that teachers would probably set better goals for themselves if they had time to Open, Immerse and Explore before they identified their yearlong goals. Because she knew about GID, she took the opportunity in her yearlong professional development to use the GID process with her teachers. Through the PD, the staff learned about the language and phases of GID from a personal perspective as they worked to clarify their own professional goals for the year. As a result, this school is a highly functioning GID school.

I bet that makes you think!

Do you have to arrive at professional goals in your school? How are you guided to come up with meaningful goals that can move the needle for your school?  How do you feel about the data you collect? Are you going through the motions? Or is it a worthwhile process to see all you’ve accomplished through the year?  how have you managed to make this a meaningful process for yourself?…. Somethings to think about.  We should return to this post in August? Or maybe even July… right?

Love to hear your thoughts-  More tomorrow on the other aspects of teacher effectiveness and GID…

Leslie Maniotes, PhD

co-creator of GID

For more on what we do and the PD we offer see our website guidedinquirydesign.com

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