Libraries are Safe Inclusive Spaces for Learning

The last post of this week is on Library as a safe space in schools.

As you know, this week I’m taking a look into the connection between GID and Colorado Department of Education’s rubric for highly effective librarians.

STANDARD 4 : Environment

A.  Safe and Inclusive Environment – safe, respectful & inclusive learning environment for all students 

Guided Inquiry Design helps librarians to foster a caring relationship with students in the learning context. Through the third space Librarians and teachers look for places where students are connecting their experiences outside school to the content of the course.

The structure of the Inquiry Tools gives students regular practice with working on engaging in respectful and open dialogue about ideas and content with other students and the librarian and teacher. Through regular practice habit take hold and students learn what respect looks and feels like in the GID context, at school and in the library.

B. Welcoming Safe Space– open, warm welcoming, and flexibly designed to meet a wide variety of needs

The library space is created to teach at point of need. GID workshops and institutes help foster an awareness of the importance of student interest in learning.  We also address using the inquiry Tools as formative assessments so that librarians and collaborating teachers have the data they need to make on the spot decisions about student learning, enabling them to teach effectively at the point of need. For more see these posts on our blog from 2016

Making it personal

I’m not a teacher, I’m an Awakener!

C. Current and Responsive Space – diverse, equitable, current 

because GID embeds technology into the course and content- the learning through the model provides that platform for current tech use to engage, act, and create.  Collaboration is at the core of the planning, design and instruction of GID and requires student collaboration in a positive learning environment.

Guided Inquiry is a huge support to librarian and teacher effectiveness TOGETHER!

Even though I made explicit connections to the Colorado standards, I hope that this connects to your own district and school’s view of effective libraries and teaching and that this weeks posts have been a useful bridge to those documents that live in your professional life.

Comments welcome- as always!

Leslie Maniotes, PhD

Co-creator of GID

GID helps librarians take on a LEADERSHIP role

This week I’m taking a look into the connection between GID and Colorado Department of Education’s rubric for highly effective librarians.  

This post moves from yesterday’s post about instruction and into today’s discussion of librarians as school and teacher leaders.

STANDARD 3 LEADERSHIP

A. School Leader – librarian serves on school committees that support instructional school goals & facilitates PD/teachers see librarian as instructional leader/students see library as cutting edge classroom and librarian as an academic leader in the school

Through collaborations with teachers using the GID framework, the librarian becomes seen as an instructional leader, knowing the resources and supporting teachers to embed information literacy into the content of meaningful units of study.  Through working with the librarian students understand the role of information and the critical analysis necessary to understand the content. Guided Inquiry is the platform that helps librarians and teachers to co-teach, collaborate and understand and use each others expertise in unique and meaningful ways across the school.

B. Professional Leader –participate and coordinate professional learning

As far as Professional Development.  Many librarians have mentioned introducing their staff to GID to give them some knowledge of the process and see the potential in the model for content instruction and embedded information literacy learning critical for all of our students.

There are many online and other professional learning opportunities within that can get people started on Guided Inquiry Design framework, of which librarians can take the lead. To name a few

  1. Reading the books in the GID series,
  2. Viewing Webinars,
  3. Using a twitter PLN and
  4. Reading or contributing to our 52 week blog challenge are a few ways librarians can seek out their own learning on GID and share it with teachers.

Organizations can also partner with BLV consulting to provide librarians in CO and around the country with the high quality PD that supports this practice.  The GID institute and train the trainer model supports districts to build capacity for GID in use and to grow this practice in use.  The GID PD  jump starts more learning teams, enabling them to accomplish this high level of practice. Through the institute teams learn together how to use the Guided Inquiry Design Model and Framework.  By collaborating at this level using the GID process teams find how to work together, helping to stop the cycle of working in silos.  It’s professional development for all that accomplishes all the goals of effective teaching of – content, literacy, information literacy, learning how to learn and social learning. (5 kinds of learning Figure 1.3 in GID page 9, Kuhlthau, Maniotes and Caspari, 2012)

Comments welcome- as always!

Leslie Maniotes, PhD

Co-creator of GID

 

 

 

Librarians as Instructional Specialists- Effective Practice Post 2

In the CO Teacher Effectiveness Framework STANDARD 2 addresses instruction, including the instructional planning an implementation of lessons.  In this post, I’ll address how GID supports librarians and teachers to achieve Exemplary status in instruction through collaborations and the through the use of the instructional design of Guided Inquiry.

A. Collaboration – librarian collaborates with most staff co teaching is an expectation/collaborates with staff, and community/students collaborate and provide evidence of new thinking

Guided Inquiry Design(R) professional development supports teachers and librarians together, to integrate content and information literacy along with digital literacy to differentiate for student needs in an interdisciplinary context.

In the delivery of lessons, Guided Inquiry is often co-taught between teachers and librarians when they are trained together in the GID institute. At the institute they design the unit together from beginning to end and can co-teach, as well as share the teaching task as needed bouncing from one to the other, through the phases.

GID also includes community resources that show teams how to use human capital from within the school and the local community as a resource for varied information and expertise.

Collaboration is one of the researched 6 C’s that students named as a support to inquiry learning. Guided Inquiry Design embeds collaboration in the large Inquiry Community as well as in small groups in Inquiry Circles.

B. Instructional Planning- backward plans to integrate digital literacy with content/interdisciplinary/students apply digital skills to demonstrate content

As for instructional planning, Guided Inquiry Design is grounded in effective teaching best practice and supports teams of teachers and librarians to shift their instruction to a facilitation of learning from teaching as telling. It is backward designed from standards and embeds information literacy and technology into content learning. (Interdisciplinary with the application of digital skills to demonstrate content)

C. Delivery – implements a variety of delivery methods/instruction is differentiated & includes reflection/ students are actively involved in using inquiry methods.

Students in the Guided Inquiry learning space (classroom or library) are engaged in inquiry learning lessons and inquiry learning process. Within each session plan the GID process encourages the use of objects, primary sources, movement, art, multimedia resources and conversation.

The GID workshop supports librarians to differentiate instruction, include reflection in every session. Our session plan template includes reflection and the inquiry tools support teachers and librarians to ensure reflection every step of the way on process of learning and content. Students are continuously engaged in their learning. Through the model, third space (Maniotes, 2005) is achieved where students are actively seeking their own interest in the content making learning meaningful and authentic.

D. Evidence of Student Growth – formative an summative assessments/shared with students and student input in creation of assessment

Teachers determine assessments with librarians in the backward planning of units through the design phase. GID embeds formative assessments throughout the learning as evidenced in the Inquiry Tools. Inquiry Tools are used through the process as evidence of student learning of content and information literacy. Data can easily be collected on student impact when using these tools.

Through the GID institute, many learning teams plan for students to engage in the creation of the assessment of the final product.

E. Reading Development –develop critical, creative and independent thinking/foster curiosity of learning/student share interests and joy of reading

Through Guided Inquiry, particularly during the Gather phase, students read with a clear purpose to critically analyze content. In the Explore phase students skim and scan texts to determine their own interest in the content of the unit of study.

All through the process students are encouraged, by multiple means, to think critically, develop creative and independent thinking as they question and wonder.

Reading/authentic literacy are practiced and applied through the GID unit as students read content area information. When relevant, literature is designed to be woven into inquiry learning to enhance understanding of a concept or add a human dimension to the course of study.  (Great example here from Kathy Stoker https://52guidedinquiry.edublogs.org/2016/04/01/differentiation-student-choice-and-reflection-oh-my/)

The focus on the third space and how to facilitate students questioning and determining their own interest in the content in the first three phases is a crucial component of the GID process.

F. Digital Literacy Modeling- librarian works with teachers to embed information literacy into content/students are empowered to act using digital skills

Within Guided Inquiry Design, librarians have the opportunity to engage in the mentoring and coaching within the context of collaborative planning and unit design with teachers. By doing the work together they can support teachers in authentic ways, share resources and act as leaders in the school. In these meetings and GID unit implementation, librarians can meaningfully embed 21st century skills, digital literacy into the content.

Using GID the students have access to embedded interdisciplinary lessons that are authentic and help them to make connections between school and the world.

Good Stuff.

Leslie Maniotes PhD

co-creator of guidedinquirydesign.com

 

3 Key Concepts in Effective Teaching – Differentiation, Self Direction, and Innovation

When I think about all the rubrics for effective teaching, whether is the Danielson Rubric or a state or district created document- there are a few key concepts that we all are striving for in future ready classrooms.

Here I’m going to show how GID is a framework that helps educators to achieve each of these concepts.

  1. DIFFERENTIATION

One of our biggest challenges in classrooms is to make sure that all of our students are engaging in increasingly challenging material for their abilities. Differentiation is the work we do to accommodate all our learners to ensure that they have access to a high level of instruction. That they are each successful with their work so that they are challenged and continually progress.

The Inquiry Tools of Guided Inquiry Design are a part of the framework that supports educators to differentiate learning through inquiry. The Inquiry Tools are based on the strategies that students named, in Kuhlthau’s research, as things that helped them persevere through the inquiry process (Kuhlthau’s 6 C’s – see below).

*Chart of 6 C’s in (Guided Inquiry Design, 2012, p 37)  and (Inquiry Tools in Guided Inquiry Design p. 40)

The Six C’s (Kuhlthau, 2004)

Collaborate Work jointly with others.
Converse Talk about ideas for clarity and further questions.
Compose Write all the way along, not just at the end; keep journals.
Choose Select what is interesting and pertinent.
Chart Visualize ideas using pictures, timelines, and graphic organizers.
Continue Develop understanding over a period of time.

In GID we translated the 6 C’s as Inquiry Tools that would be embedded throughout each phase of the process. It’s hard to keep all those strategies in our heads all the time while teaching and planning lessons.  Guided Inquiry Design makes it easier. Teachers use the Inquiry Tools to differentiate and support learners at all levels to deeply engage in their learning. Routine use of the Inquiry Tools facilitates active learning through the inquiry process.

Guided Inquiry Design: Inquiry Tools (Figure 3.2 in Guided Inquiry Design p.40)
Inquiry communities

for collaborating

An inquiry community is a collaborative environment where students learn with each other in a large group.
Inquiry circles

for conversing

Inquiry circles are small groups organized for conversations about interesting ideas, meaningful questions, and emerging insights.
Inquiry journals

for composing

Inquiry journals provide a way for individuals to compose and reflect throughout the inquiry process.
Inquiry logs

for choosing

Inquiry logs provide a way of keeping track of the quality sources that are chosen as important for addressing an inquiry question.
Inquiry charts

for charting

Inquiry charts provide a way to visualize, organize, and synthesize ideas in the inquiry process.
Inquiry tools

for continuing

All of the inquiry tools are for continuing and sustaining the inquiry process to completion.

See this blog post on IEP’s and student learning with GID (Post from our blog in 2016)

  1. SELF DIRECTED LEARNERS

We all want engaged students.  Self direction and engagement go hand in hand.

For learners to become self directed, they must first understand themselves as a learner. Then they can come to know strategies that support their own learning. Within the phases and sessions of Guided Inquiry Design students have the advantage of consistent self reflection.  Through regular and routine reflection, students have time to think about, not only, what they are learning, but how they are learning it.

In these reflections, students reflect on their use of the Inquiry Tools.  The tools keep them active in the process as they write, talk with others, collaborate, chart and choose.  At the end of each session each day, students reflect on how these and other tasks supported their thinking and learning.

Teachers and librarians alike benefit from professional development on how to embed these tools into inquiry based learning.  The GID institute supports the efficient use of these tools so that the learning team of teachers and librarian can gather important student data on learning and support them to know how they can direct their own learning as a result. Knowing our learners is a first step to helping them know themselves and the Inquiry Tools are a structure that helps you to do just that.

  1. INNOVATION

Creating is the product of learning-  creation of new thinking, new connections, and new understandings.  The process of Guided Inquiry Design leads students to a meaningful Create phase.  In the CREATE phase students take time to consider what they have learned and what they can create in order to share that learning and information with others.

Rather than creation for creation sake, students follow the path of research to ask meaningful questions, seek relevant information and create to communicate their ideas and understandings with the world, to make a difference, tell a story, or invent something new.  Invention is part of the GID process, and GID practitioners recognize the importance of the guidance we can provide to have our students reach higher places with their research and innovation.

 

Leslie Maniotes, PhD

Co-creator of guidedinquirydesign.com

 

 

We all want to be Highly Effective!

hello everybody!

While I take some time to set up the schedule of the blog for 2017, I thought I would post some of what I have been thinking about and working on as of late.

All across the U.S. we have had a major movement in teacher effectiveness.  I became a part that movement when I joined the group of educators in Denver Public Schools called the Teacher Effectiveness Coaches.  Through my years with that group- we studied effectiveness in teaching.  We learned and collaborated together on how to foster increasing effectiveness through coaching at the school level.  It was very challenging work, and I learned so much through those years.  Since my awareness has been heightened to what it takes, emotionally, organizationally, on stage and off stage to be an effective teacher,  much of what I learned through those years has been applied and embedded into Guided Inquiry Design. I was working on the creation of GID while in those positions. Whether it is in the session planning, or in the workshops I do, when I train teams on how to design and implement inquiry based learning, effective teaching practices is core to what we do.

So, when the Colorado Department of Education (CDE) put out a Highly Effective School Library Program rubric, (which you can view here) I was really excited.  I believe in standards.  I think it’s important that people  know what to look for, and what is expected of them and that those expectations are clear.  When people have clear expectations, they can reach to higher heights as long as the bar is set high. From an administrative perspective, rubrics and standards of the field help us to hold people accountable to a high standard.  But what’s most important is that we are each pushing for that in our own work. And that’s why you’re here reading this right now, because you want to learn and grow as a professional- GO YOU!!

Through  my professional development workshops around the country and abroad and in conversations with excellent educators about GID, I have come to recognize that GID is a complex approach to teaching that requires a high level of our craft.

When I got my hands on the CDE rubric, I couldn’t wait to make connections to GID. I wanted to see if it would align and how GID might be used as a means to support CO educators to reach the highest level of their craft for the benefit of our students!

In the next couple of posts I am going to share my explanation of GID as a means to a highly effective library program.  I’m hoping this will begin a larger conversation around effective library programs and GID’s role in that for future ready libraries and schools!

So #1 on the Rubric is  Planning

By planning the authors meant having professional goals- (This document intentionally reflects the same wording as the teacher effectiveness framework in CO.  The library rubric was meant to support administrators to evaluate librarians in their role as teachers, valuing the difference in the work that they do, as well as making clear connections to how librarians are/can be most effective teachers.)

STANDARD 1

Program Standard 1: Planning

Planning for the future is an essential role for a successful teacher librarian and library program. Annual review of school focus goals, library data and collaborative input from the school community is part of developing a plan of action for continuous quality improvement

Component A: Planning

The teacher librarian, along with the principal, creates and uses school-aligned goals as a guide for developing a library program and instruction that positively impacts student achievement and helps students thrive in today’s society.
The teacher librarian uses data and reflection to measure implementation of goals.

Planning

Though you might not think that GID is related to teacher goal setting, it very well can (and maybe should) be. In one amazing school, the principal (knowing the research of the ISP) saw the connection between what it might take for teachers to identify goals  to work on for the year and the GID process. She saw that teachers would probably set better goals for themselves if they had time to Open, Immerse and Explore before they identified their yearlong goals. Because she knew about GID, she took the opportunity in her yearlong professional development to use the GID process with her teachers. Through the PD, the staff learned about the language and phases of GID from a personal perspective as they worked to clarify their own professional goals for the year. As a result, this school is a highly functioning GID school.

I bet that makes you think!

Do you have to arrive at professional goals in your school? How are you guided to come up with meaningful goals that can move the needle for your school?  How do you feel about the data you collect? Are you going through the motions? Or is it a worthwhile process to see all you’ve accomplished through the year?  how have you managed to make this a meaningful process for yourself?…. Somethings to think about.  We should return to this post in August? Or maybe even July… right?

Love to hear your thoughts-  More tomorrow on the other aspects of teacher effectiveness and GID…

Leslie Maniotes, PhD

co-creator of GID

For more on what we do and the PD we offer see our website guidedinquirydesign.com

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