Avoid Cheetah Reports in 8 Easy Steps!

Remember this charming critter from my last entry? My Guided Inquiry Design mascot? This creature is a Pompeii Worm, and the reason it represents the power of GID, to me, is that this animal was selected by one of our Grade 4 students as the subject of his Guided Inquiry project on animal adaptations.

 

Hello. It's me again. Photo credit: Alison Murray, ARKive

Hello. It’s me again. Photo credit: Alison Murray, ARKive

If you’re an elementary teacher, I’m sure you’ve encountered an animal project in some form. You know the drill… the kids choose an animal and do a little report on it: what it eats, where it lives, etc. This kind of project is a nice introduction to research skills, and because most kids are interested in animals to some degree, there is high motivation. You will find that the vast majority of students will pick pretty standard animals. Wolves. Zebras. Sharks.(Note: when I was in Grade 3, I chose echidnas, thus cementing my nerdiness for years to come. I digress.)

However, it is a truth universally acknowledged that at least 55% of your class will choose cheetahs.

Yeah, we get it, Cheetah. You're very noble. Photo credit: Anup Shah, ARKive

We get it, Cheetah. You’re very noble. Photo credit: Anup Shah, ARKive

Look, I have no problem with cheetahs. They run fast. Their claws are unretractable. They hunt gazelles. They are endangered.  Their cubs are ridiculously adorable.  Cheetahs are LEGIT. I get the appeal. Kids LOVE them.

OMG SO CUTE | Photo credit: Suzi Eszterhas, ARKive

OMG SO CUTE | Photo credit: Suzi Eszterhas, ARKive

But they are so… predictable. I’m sure you’ve marked dozens – nay, hundreds! – of cheetah reports in your professional life. It’s time to move on. Wouldn’t you rather learn about something a little different? A little out-there? For instance… a Pompeii worm?

A cheetah’s got nothing  on a Pompeii worm. (I mean, fine, a cheetah would easily take one down  if, say, a Pompeii worm somehow found itself stranded on the Serengeti. No contest there. I’m speaking more ontologically.)

Team Pompeii Worm | Photo credit: Greg Rouse, ARKive

Team Pompeii Worm | Photo credit: Greg Rouse, ARKive

 

These guys live in the deep sea in hydrothermal vents. The end of the worm that sticks out in the water has to endure near-freezing temperatures in the frigid water of the deep ocean. So? Lots of organisms live in the deep ocean. The really cool thing about Pompeii worms is the end of the worm that’s in the vent has to contend with blasts of hot water that can be as high as 80 degrees Celsius, or 176 Fahrenheit. How does it survive in this environment? Most animals would poach themselves within seconds, yet these worms thrive in such a hostile environment because of bacteria that live on their bodies that help to regulate their temperature!

Admit it: that’s cool. Or hot. (Whatever.)

How did we discover Pompeii worms? Well, Guided Inquiry guided us to them! The whole process was important, but because we leveraged the power of the first three phases – Open, Immerse, Explore – for this unit, the students were able to explore some carefully curated resources about animal adaptations and make notes on different adaptations and animals that have them. In this way, the boys were exposed to a vast array of animals that they might not know about, and successfully carry out their research. Rather than designing the project around teacher-led discussion on adaptations, the boys discovered the concept on their own and built knowledge themselves.

The provincial learning objective for this Grade 4 science unit was: “All living things and their environment are interdependent.”  The instructional team – the Grade 4 teachers, our wonderful Inquiry resource teacher and myself – decided that the students should learn about how different environments can affect the adaptations that animals have developed to survive. These would be independent projects culminating in an animal “fact file” with a labelled diagram and paragraph.

 

Fact files on display. Photo credit: me

Fact files on display. Photo credit: me

 

We started the OPEN phase by projecting a panoramic Google maps photo of Dinosaur Provincial Park in our neighbouring province of Alberta. This park looks very different from our own local temperate rainforest, so we had the boys brainstorm and discuss questions about the environment there. What kinds of animals might you find there that you wouldn’t find in Vancouver? Why? We then went out to our wooded area to take photos with iPads. This OPEN activity got the boys thinking about how environments can impact plants and animals.

We timed this project around the boys’ first overnight outdoor education trip, which became their IMMERSE phase. They spent two days at a local outdoor centre, where most of the programming revolved around adaptations of local flora and fauna. Full disclosure: I did not attend. I stayed warm and dry, but from all accounts, the experience was highly IMMERSive!

After they returned from camp, we set up the EXPLORE phase. Instead of letting the boys go nuts on Google, or wreak havoc on my painstakingly arranged 590s shelves, we gave them only one option: a brilliant website from BBC Nature: Animal and plant adaptations and behaviours This site has an exhaustive list of adaptations, with an easy to read description for each and multiple examples of organisms. We put the boys into Inquiry Circles and had them browse the site, noting down on a specially-created worksheet any animals or adaptations that they thought were interesting.

Because this BBC site has such an exhaustive list of adaptations, and because we gave them free range to browse the site, the boys were learning about everything from behavioural adaptations such as swarming, to feeding strategies like kleptoparasitism! Thus, one young man discovered the Pompeii worm, neatly filed away under symbiosis. His curiosity was piqued. What the heck is a Pompeii worm? (Probably what you were thinking at the beginning of this post!)

After a couple of sessions exploring the BBC site, we helped the boys review their notes and IDENTIFY an animal they really wanted to learn more about, and to write a strong research question about it beginning with “Why” or “How”.

From there, we provided more curated resources for GATHER: the BBC site again, ARKive, World Book, and in some cases, reliable websites that I vetted for those boys who chose an unusual animal with scarce information available.

They CREATEd their fact files and we SHAREd with a big celebratory class session involving small-group informal presentations and a gallery walk of all the files. Finally, the boys were EVALUATEd on the science learning objective as well as a self-assessment on the whole process.

The results? The boys were so motivated and excited each week when they came to the library. The learning was student-centered with each boy striving to answer his own question, instead of following a list of criteria from the teachers. Those pesky note-taking skills were a breeze to teach, and the science learning objective was hit out of the park (ask one of our Grade 4s about any possible adaptation – they know them all!)

Those are all very noble, altruistic goals for the betterment of our darling students. Allow me to be selfish for a moment – of 48 projects completed there was not a single one on cheetahs. If that’s not a career highlight, I don’t know what is.

 

Call Me a Covert Operator

Before I begin you need to know 5 things.

  1. Everybody learned something.
  2. Mistakes were made.
  3. Lessons were learned.
  4. No students were harmed.
  5. Battles did ensue.

I am a covert operative.  My first Guided Inquiry Design unit was done without calling it by name.  You see, I had some third grade teachers who wanted to do a research project based on an animal classification unit they were about to complete.  When what should come to my mind?   Animal Smackdown! I shared some ideas about what we could do and at the same time I was thinking I’m going to put a Guided Inquiry Design spin on this and no one is going to know.  We planned the unit and discussed how things would go, but I never called it Guided Inquiry, I considered this my top secret assignment to see how I could make Guided Inquiry work at Kennedy.  

Open

The first part of this strategy was an Open that would grab students, and honestly teachers too.  My go to materials in this scenario were some carefully selected excerpts from a variety of informational texts.  I would read excerpts from the text that usually were pretty impressive things like how a slow loris can rub it’s underarm to activate a poison that can lead to a toxic bite and we would discuss things about how that would be advantageous against another primate or other animals.  We did this for many different animals and would discuss size versus natural defenses and who would or would not win in a battle.  Students became really engaged in this discussion in large part due to the classroom community their teachers had set up throughout the school year.  I ended the Open with a simple statement, “Imagine what animal you would choose if you were going to battle all other animals.  We will meet back tomorrow.”   

 

animal book LunchFight

 

 

 

 

 

Explore

When we met back the following day students set out on the Explore process since they were already being immersed in the terminology and content that we would be studying during instructional time in the classroom, in what we call, Core Knowledge Read Alouds.  During this time I instructed students that they were to begin looking at animals using informational texts in the library or electronic encyclopedias that we had available including Encyclopedia Britannica and World Book.   As students set out on this process the Inquiry Community of the classroom began to shine.  In particular, there was a specific student who was able to break his stereotype in the classroom community when he was able to demonstrate a specific feature in World Book where you can compare animals side by side.  He showed his neighbors and they showed their neighbors and soon the entire class knew how to use this feature to compare animals.  This is the moment when Guided Inquiry Design cemented it’s place in my pedagogical heart.

WB

Identify

Following the success of the Open and Explore stages I began to let the teachers in on the secret of Guided Inquiry Design.  They were intrigued and willing to keep moving forward. After wrapping up the explore stage students, teachers and I worked together with students on the development of their inquiry questions.  Ultimately, these questions would be able to demonstrate why a particular animal would be the best, but it could be based on anything and the persuasiveness of the students argument would be crucial to expressing why their animal was the best.

Gather

Students researched adaptability, agility, habitats, predators, prey and more of the animal that they zeroed in on and they went from there.  I would push into classrooms during this time and due to the open concept I would basically just roam through all three since they were adjoined and help as needed.  Teachers also allowed research time during intervention blocks.  Students chose to research when completed with work instead of playing academic games on sites like MobyMax, Sum Dog or Achieve 3000.  They. Chose. To. Research. INSTEAD!

Share

I admit to not being a Guided Inquiry Design aficionado at this point in time, so during the Create stage we provided students a template of a trading card that they would use to share the information they collected with all 3rd grade classes during a Google Hangout where they would battle another card, Pokemon style.  We had a bracket and students were able to discuss with their classes why a certain animal should or should not win the battle and then students voted.  This should take about two weeks to do based on the number of times we had to meet and could be done quicker. I will admit though, that due to training, breaks and daily schedules it took us about a month to go through all the rounds.  Still, throughout this time students were excited every time they would watch the hangout live or via YouTube and discuss the battles.  Teachers led discussions with students throughout this process to discuss the animals and  identify what information would fill in gaps.  Students further researched animals if they were inclined to as well.  Ultimately, a “winner” was selected and I did award a trophy during our December assembly.  The entire third grade went wild!  The principal was elated to see students so excited about the project.  Parents spoke to me about what their students were doing.  Pause.  PARENTS, spoke to ME about what their students were learning.  That is a big thing for a Teacher-Librarian because we usually come in contact with parents at a book fair or while discussing a lost book.

Evaluate

Students completed a simple survey as a formal evaluation of their work.  Their teachers and I conducted ongoing formative assessments throughout the process.  I’ll admit, this is one area where I struggled with this project, but I am certain all learning objectives were met for this project.

My closing thoughts about this unit are that I’m excited to do it again, now that one of the teachers has been through a Guided Inquiry Design Institute.  By the time we finished all three of the classroom teachers were on board with conducting more Guided Inquiry Design units in the future. We are planning on doing this particular unit again, along with a unit that will integrate into state history as part of the Social Studies curriculum.

Tomorrow I will discuss my 4th grade unit and on Friday I will share how I’m planning on moving forward in my practice as a Teacher-Librarian using Guided Inquiry Design.

-Stacy

@StacyFord77